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Warners as Executors & Trustees

Warners are happy to be named as executors and trustees under a Will.  Your executors are responsible for the administration of your estate following your death, the responsibility of which includes giving effect to the provisions of your Will.  You should consider appointing at least two executors.  If you wish, you can appoint the Principals of Warners as executors.  Warners’ lawyers use their specialist expertise, including knowledge not only of the law of Wills but also the laws of property, trusts and tax to deal with you estate in the most efficient way possible.  

Alternatively, Warners can be appointed to act alongside friends and/or members of your family or in default of your primary executors in case one or more of them were to predecease you.  

Particular care should be taken when appointing executors if your Will contains trusts that are likely to continue following your death (either for tax planning or personal reasons).

Similarly, if you set up trusts during your lifetime, Warners can be named as trustees of those trusts.  This could be particularly helpful where there are no family members who you want to act or where there are potential conflicts between the beneficiaries of the trust.

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